Degu For Sale

Found in central Chile, the degu is a rodent that is akin to a chinchilla or guinea pig. Degus reach a maximum size of about nine and a half inches to twelve inches in length and a weight of six to twelve ounces. It has a long, thin tail that ends in a tuft of black fur. It is covered with brown fur with lighter colored fur around its eyes and neck. The animal’s cheek teeth are formed is a figure-eight shape, which is why the degu’s genus name is “octodon”.

BABY DEGUS- Rare colors!!! FINANCING AVAILABLE & SHIPPING

  • Name: KyTy Critters
  • Posted: 06/30/2020
  • Phone: 816+344-8557
  • Email: Email Seller
  • Location: Missouri
  • Website: http://www.kytycritters.com

Baby degus available  in a variety of rare colors.  All of our babies come pre-spoiled, and with a health guarantee!   We offer shipping, and lifetime support for any questions or concerns you have!!!!  For mor...

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Baby degus!

  • Name: Alice
  • Posted: 05/19/2020
  • Phone: 7154181084
  • Email: Email Seller
  • Location: Wisconsin

Baby degus!! 6 needing homes 😊

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Black Degus! Shipping and Financing Available

  • Name: KyTy Critters
  • Posted: 02/20/2020
  • Phone: 8163448557
  • Email: Email Seller
  • Location: Missouri
  • Website: http://www.kytycritters.com

Black degu babies!!!!! We offer shipping, and lifetime support for any questions or concerns you have!!!! For more information (including SHIPPING, AVAILABILITY, PHOTOS, PRICES & MORE) please visit our website: www.kytycritters.com Feel f...

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Baby degus for sale

  • Price: $150.00
  • Name: Lisa meerbeek
  • Posted: 01/13/2020
  • Phone: 6053106834
  • Email: Email Seller
  • Location: Iowa

Baby degus

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Degus

  • Price: $40.00
  • Name: Megan
  • Posted: 12/08/2019
  • Email: Email Seller
  • Location: Florida

Two 6 month old female degus. Can go together or separate. Would be great for breeding. Local pick up only (shipping would cost way too much)! $25 each or $40 for both.

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Degus, Pieds & Blues

  • Name: Panhandle Exotics
  • Posted: 10/31/2019
  • Phone: 8505424410
  • Email: Email Seller
  • Location: Florida
  • Website: http://www.PanhandleExotics.com
  • Trusted Seller

Come by the store, call us at (850) 542-4410 or visit us online at www.PanhandleExotics.com for prices and information.Looking for the perfect pet?  Then check us out!  We are Panhandle Exotics, your exotic pet store! We match zoo qual...

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Degu

A large, multilevel cage like the ones made for chinchillas or ferrets would be ideal for a degu. The minimum size should be 24-inches by 18-inches by 24-inches. Degus are voracious chewers so the cage should be made of wire, not wood. Degus are prone to foot problems, too, so they need cages with solid flooring rather than wire. Cedar or pine bedding should be avoided. Paper-based bedding is much safer. The cage should have a nesting box so that the animal has a place to go where it feels secure.

What do Degu Eat in Captivity?

In the wild, degus eat a diet that is high in roughage and low in carbohydrates. In captivity, these animals should be fed a combination of guinea pig or chinchilla pellets along with timothy hay and a variety of fresh vegetables. They can be given uncooked carrots, sweet potatoes, green beans, and broccoli. They also like leafy greens such as spinach or kale, and can eat dandelion leaves as a special treat. They should avoid eating fruits due to the high sugar content.

Degu Enrichment

Degus need lots of exercise so a running wheel, preferably one that is at least 11 inches in diameter, will give the animal ample opportunity to run. Thick branches placed in the cage will give the degu spots to climb and to chew. In fact, they should be given plenty of chew toys, wood blocks, and willow balls. The degu will climb on cotton ropes and enjoys sitting on loft perches. Toys designed for parrots can also be used to entertain the animal.

Breeding Degu in Captivity

Breeding time for the degus in the wild usually starts when the area begins receiving twelve hours of sunlight per day, but they are breed year round in captivity. The gestational period is about three months, after which the female gives birth to, on average, about six pups. The babies should be held only minimally during the first three weeks so that they are not stressed out. They will be weaned at about six weeks of age.